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Canine Companions: Stories of unconditional love

In keeping with our values of radical inclusivity and acceptance, GLIDE has a long-standing policy of welcoming all people, as well as their animals, through our doors. On any given day at GLIDE, you will see dogs in backpacks, strollers, baby slings, tote bags and on leashes. In celebration of the unconditional love that animals and humans provide one another, here is a look at some of the dogs and their humans that have made an impact on us over the years.

Richard and Kane.

“All the GLIDE staff are wonderful to me and Kane. Now I have a real apartment. I save $300 a month to pay my rent. This has given me back my dignity. GLIDE allows me to be an individual and Kane is recognized as an individual, not just a dog.”

Bailey and Marley.

The sweeps are what originally caught my eye about GLIDE Harm Reduction, the fact that you can go out and collect all the needles in the street. I live about three blocks away, I take my dog on walks around here and it’s dirty! I have to make sure my dog’s not stepping on dirty needles! It’s a really awesome program and as soon as I started helping with the sweeps I wanted to do more.

Marley was five weeks old when I got him. It was the night of a blood moon and I was sleeping in the woods in Oregon at the time. When I brought him to my camp, we stayed up together and howled at the blood moon.

For a long time I was very nomadic. This is the first time I’ve lived indoors in the last six years. Before that I was sleeping outside under the stars. But sleeping in the city, in doorways, is really scary, and he’s always protected me. I’ve been in the weirdest situations while hitchhiking by myself, and he’s got my back.

Bill, GLIDE Harm Reduction Syringe Access Outreach Coordinator, and Rosie.

As far as the people we serve, people experiencing homelessness or struggling with chaotic substance use, a dog can take them to a grounding, centering place. I think also give them a sense of meaning, purpose and connection, especially if they’re lacking a healthy social support network with humans. Dogs will at least give them some love in their life, and we know that everyone does better with a little love in their life!

Rosie helps me to be grounded and centered, more so than I would be without her. If I get frustrated or angry, I look at her and everything melts away. How can I be pissed off when I’m looking at that little face? She contributes to this whole office area being a better place!

John and Odin

I used to not be homeless and I lived on the East Coast and hiked the Appalachian Trail a lot. One fateful night six years ago, me and a buddy are out camping and we stopped for the night. We hear whining and small barking! I’m like, whatever, somebody camped near us. We’re chilling, we’re hanging out, we’re talking, and it gets closer! We ignore it for a good 10, 20 minutes. Finally it drives me nuts to the point where I open up the tent and I look out and about five feet away he’s sitting there staring me in the eye going, “Dude!”

We look around, there’s no campfire, there’s no lights, I hollered for people to see if anybody had lost their dog. I pulled him into the tent, he had no collar or tags, no nothing. As soon as he got into the tent, he ducked into my sleeping bag, curled up, and passed out! Done! I thought, all right, well I guess you’re sleepin’ here tonight!

I can’t sleep without him now. He keeps me calm, he keeps me going. Eventually my girl and I are going to end up getting some land in Arizona and starting a farm. The whole premise behind it is Odin and our other dog.


Amber or Syringe Access Services and Daydream.

Daydream has been my dog for a little over seven years. She’s 11. She was my partner’s and when he passed away, I got her. She has absolutely saved my life. Without her, I don’t think I would be on this plane anymore. That was one of the hardest times of my life.

We pretty quickly ended up on the streets and she helped to keep me sane. She would keep me warm at night, and safe from all sorts of external issues like sexual assault, robbery… I didn’t start having seizures until after I got her. She’d been my partner’s seizure alert dog. I had no idea what was going on the first time, and she knew exactly what to do and took care of me. After that, she became able to let me know before I would get them, and I got on medication. Thankfully I don’t get them very often anymore, but I’m able to recognize what that feels like when they’re coming on. Without her, I don’t know how far along I’d be on that.