GLIDE Participates in the Great American Smokeout

by Brooke Finkmoore, GLIDE Health Services, UCSF MEPN

November 17 marks the American Cancer Society's 36th Great American Smokeout

UCSF nursing students have been busily making calls to clients of GLIDE Health Services who are current smokers and encouraging them to participate in an interactive smoking cessation workshop: 2:30 – 3:30pm tomorrow (November 17) in the 6th Floor Group Room. November 17th marks the American Cancer Society’s 36th annual Great American Smokeout, a day dedicated to encouraging smokers to make a plan to quit cigarettes and begin making progress towards a healthier life.
Led by nursing students, the smoking cessation workshop will guide participants through self-assessments which encourage them to reflect on their reasons for smoking and allow participants to share their smoking stories with each other. Participants will leave the workshop with cessation strategies and resources, information about medical smoking cessation aids, and the encouragement to make a plan to quit.
Tobacco use remains the single largest preventable cause of disease and premature death in the US. GLIDE is dedicated to giving clients the tools to support healthy lives; therefore, GLIDE is dedicated to giving clients the tools to reduce tobacco use. We acknowledges that quitting is hard and understands that the chances of successful smoking cessation are increased with help and support.
What are the benefits of quitting smoking*?

  • 20 minutes after quitting: Your heart rate and blood pressure drop
  • 12 hours after quitting: The carbon monoxide level in your blood drops to normal.
  • 2 weeks to 3 months after quitting: Your circulation improves and your lung function increases
  • 1 to 9 months after quitting: Coughing and shortness of breath decrease; lungs start to regain normal function.
  • 1 year after quitting: The excess risk of coronary heart disease is half that of a continuing smoker’s.
  • 5 years after quitting: Risk of cancer of the mouth, throat, esophagus, and bladder are cut in half. Cervical cancer risk falls to that of a non-smoker. Stroke risk can fall to that of a non-smoker after 2-5 years.

There are more benefits of quitting smoking for good. Quitting smoking also lowers the risk of diabetes and heart disease. Quitting cigarettes at any age can give back years of life that would be lost by continuing to smoke.
Join us on November 17, and find out more about the Great American Smokeout!
* Cited from Tobacco Control: Reversal of Risk After Quitting Smoking. IARC Handbooks of Cancer Prevention, Vol. 11. 2007. p 11

GLIDE is collecting new toys for the children of very low-income families in our community who might otherwise go without this holiday season. 

Purchase toys directly from our Amazon wishlist to have them shipped directly to GLIDE before December 10th.

www.glide.org/toy

GLIDE is collecting new toys for the children of very low-income families in our community who might otherwise go without this holiday season. 

Purchase toys directly from our Amazon wishlist to have them shipped directly to GLIDE before December 10th.

www.glide.org/toy